Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Mar 30, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: February New Home Sales reached their best level in seven years, while U.S. economic growth for 2014 was disappointing.

Forecast for the Week: A packed economic calendar is ahead, culminating with Friday’s Jobs Report for March.

View: Use these tips to help avoid flight delays, or make any delays you do experience more palatable.

Last Week in Review

“You take the good, you take the bad.” The Facts of Life. That television series theme song also applies to recent economic news, as housing is a bright spot while economic growth overall remains sluggish.

new-home-sales_2015-03-30New Home Sales surged in February, rising 8 percent from January to an annual rate of 539,000 units, while January’s sales were revised higher to 500,000. New Home Sales now stand at their best level since February 2008 and are up nearly 25 percent from the 432,000 recorded in February 2014. The report also showed that the median sales price for new homes was $275,500, up 2.6 percent from a year ago.

Existing Home Sales also rose by a modest 1.2 percent in February, to an annual rate of 4.88 million units, which was just below expectations. Low inventories were said to be a key factor in price growth, which rose at the fastest pace in a year.

However, growth for our economy overall is still sluggish. The final reading on fourth quarter 2014 Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was unchanged from the second reading, coming in at 2.2 percent. This was well below the 5 percent recorded in the third quarter of last year. For all of 2014, GDP was 2.42 percent, which is disappointing considering we are six years into our economic recovery. One positive item to note from the report: Consumer spending rose to 4.4 percent, which is the fastest rate since the first quarter of 2006.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain attractive, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

Key reports on inflation, manufacturing and housing are ahead, along with the Jobs Report for March.

  • The packed economic calendar will kick off on Monday with the Fed’s favorite measure of inflation, Personal Consumption Expenditures, along with Personal Income and Personal Spending.
  • In housing news, Pending Home Sales will be released Monday, followed by the S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index on Tuesday.
  • Also on Tuesday, we’ll get a read on Consumer Confidence.
  • In the manufacturing sector, look for the Chicago PMI on Tuesday and the ISM Index on Wednesday.
  • The first of two key labor market reports will be delivered on Wednesday with the ADP National Employment Report.
  • As usual, Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will be released on Thursday.
  • That brings us to Friday’s Jobs Report for March, which will be dissected to the fullest extent by investors around the globe. The Jobs Report includes Non-farm Payrolls, the Unemployment Rate and Hourly Earnings.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving—and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further—a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Mortgage Bonds worsened in recent days after rallying earlier this month. However, home loan rates remain near record lows.

Chart: Fannie Mae 3.0% Mortgage Bond (Friday Mar 27, 2015)

mgt-bonds-2015-03-30

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

Help! My Flight is Delayed!

Earlier this year, a Texas to Oklahoma flight scheduled to last 58 minutes turned into a 9-hour nightmare as the plane was delayed due to bad weather. While avoiding flight delays entirely may be impossible, there are some steps you can take before, during and after experiencing one.

Before you fly. Technology and big data to the rescue! FiveThirtyEight has analyzed 6 million flights and discovered which airports, airlines and routes are most likely to arrive on time. Check out your upcoming or future flights here.

Know your rights. Take a minute to review the specific details of your airline’s customer service plan (here are links for Delta, United, JetBlue and American Airlines). If your airline fails to meet its commitments, you can submit a complaint to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Aviation Consumer Protection Division.

If you get stranded. Visit the FlyersRights.org Help! I’m Stranded page for a list of helpful information, including airline phone numbers. If you can take a different flight, the Next Flight app lets you check for non-stop flights for the current day and following two days. In case you’re stuck, Priority Pass gives details on 700 airport VIP lounges, before you shell out membership fees.

Feel free to pass these helpful tips along to your team, clients and colleagues.

econ-cal-2015-03-30

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

If you prefer to send your removal request by mail the address is:

Don Parsons
Commerce Mortgage – NMLS 2105
450 Newport Center Drive Suite 350
Newport Beach, CA 92660
2130 Main Street Suite 260
Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Jan 19, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: Retail sales plummeted, inflation remains tame, and home loan rates are hovering near record lows.Forecast for the Week: It’s a holiday-shortened week, with housing reports dominating the headlines.View: These five podcasts are great tools to help you succeed this year.
Last Week in Review 
Shop or drop. Fewer people than expected opened their wallets in December, as the latest Retail Sales numbers declined. But with home loan rates hovering near historic lows, not all of last week’s headlines were disappointing. Retail Sales plunged by 0.9 percent in December, the biggest decline in nearly a year as lower gas prices didn’t have the desired impact on consumer spending during the busy shopping season. November’s numbers were also revised lower. This news was a bit of a surprise, and not the best sign for our overall economic recovery. But one number doesn’t make a trend, so this will be an important report to watch in the coming months.On the inflation front, inflation at the wholesale level remained tamed in December while the Consumer Price Index showed its smallest gain in five years, mainly due to plunging oil prices. We are beginning to see disinflationary pressures, which is a slower rate of inflation over a shorter time period. While low inflation is Bond-friendly news (and also good for home loan rates, since they are tied to Mortgage Bonds), outright deflation is a sustained fall in prices. That is something we do not want to see because deflation also brings increased unemployment. Inflation is another key item to monitor as we move ahead into 2015.

Also of note, the World Bank cut its forecast for global growth, warning that the world economy remains overly reliant on the “single engine” of the U.S. recovery. If negative news from overseas continues, we could see safe haven trading into our Bond market, helping Mortgage Bonds and home loan rates in the process.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near historic lows, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Jan 5, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: The U.S. economy had a strong third quarter, while recent housing reports show signs of slowing in that sector.

Forecast for the Week: On Friday, the Jobs Report for December could be a market mover.

View: If you received new electronics over the holidays, see the tips below for selling, recycling or donating your old gadgets.

Last Week in Review 

“It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day…and I’m feeling good.” Nina Simone. The new year is here, and with home loan rates still near historic lows, 2015 rang in with plenty for consumers to feel good about. Here are some other highlights from the end of 2014.

existing-home-sales-2015-01-05 The final reading for Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third quarter of 2014 came in at a blistering 5.0 percent, the fastest pace of economic growth since the third quarter of 2003. The big gains were led by a surge in both consumer and business spending. GDP is considered the broadest measure of economic activity, so this is a strong sign for our economy heading into the new year.

In housing news, the October S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index came in at an annual rate of 4.5 percent, down from the 4.8 percent recorded in September. The October reading was the eleventh straight month of decelerating price gains. It was also the smallest annual gain since October 2012, as price gains return to more normal levels. Also of note, sales of new and existing homes fell in November as well. The housing market continues to remain in a somewhat choppy trend, despite an improving economy and job market.

As we look ahead into 2015, the uncertainty in Europe will continue to rear its head over time. The European Union (EU) is fighting deflation, recessionary pressures, a Greece exit from the EU, and limited political capital required for the necessary fixes. This could lead to safe haven trading in our bond market, helping Mortgage Bonds and home loan rates (which are tied to Mortgage Bonds) in the process.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near historic lows, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Dec 22, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: While lower oil prices are giving people reason to cheer, there was some disappointing news in the housing sector.

Forecast for the Week: A full slate of economic reports will be released ahead of the Christmas holiday.

View: Saying “no” can be easy with these five tips.

Last Week in Review

“You make me wanna (Shout!)” These days, many people are shouting for joy as gas prices continue to plunge. But was the rest of the week’s news cause to celebrate? Read on for details.

consumer-price-index_2014-12-19Falling gas prices were definitely a key factor leading consumer prices lower in November, as the Consumer Price Index fell by 0.3 percent. The inflation-reading gauge posted its largest monthly decline in six years. Low inflation is good news for Bonds, as inflation reduces the value of fixed investments like Bonds. This means low inflation is also good news for home loan rates, which are tied to Mortgage Bonds.

Over in the housing sector, November Housing Starts fell by 1.6 percent from October to an annual rate of 1.028 million units. Single-family starts fell 5.4 percent, while the volatile multi-family segment rose by 6.7 percent. Building Permits in November also declined. Despite these decreases, the housing sector has been improving overall. In addition, the recent strong Jobs Report for November is a good sign for economic growth next year—and that should help the housing sector continue its otherwise improving trend.

Also of significance: The Fed held its last Federal Open Market Committee meeting of 2014, and it noted that it will keep the Fed Funds Rate (the rate banks use to lend money to each other overnight) low until it feels that the economy can function normally with higher rates. This led to a rally in Stocks, while Mortgage Bonds and home loan rates remain near 18-month bests.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

The first half of the week will be busy, with key reports on housing, inflation and economic growth.

  • In the housing sector, Existing Home Sales for November will be released on Monday. November New Home Sales follow on Tuesday.
  • The final reading on third quarter Gross Domestic Product will be closely watched when the numbers are delivered on Tuesday.
  • Tuesday also brings several more key reports, including the Consumer Sentiment Index, Durable Goods Orders, Personal Income, Personal Spending and Personal Consumption Expenditures (the Fed’s favorite measure of inflation).
  • Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will be released on Wednesday instead of Thursday due to the Christmas holiday.

The Stock markets will close early at 1:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, December 24, while the Bond markets will be closing at 2:00 p.m. EST. All markets will be closed on Thursday, December 25 in observance of Christmas. On Friday, December 26 there will be normal market hours.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Mortgage Bonds remain near 18-month highs, meaning home loan rates are still hovering near historic lows.

Chart: Fannie Mae 3.5% Mortgage Bond (Friday Dec 19, 2014)

mortgage-bonds_2014-12-19

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

5 Ways to Say No

The holidays aren’t the only time of year people over-commit themselves and being able to say no isn’t always easy. But there are ways to say no that make all the difference, and can help you preserve both your sanity and your relationships.

Christine Carter, Ph.D., sociologist, happiness expert at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, and author of “The Sweet Spot: How to Find Your Groove at Home and Work” (coming January 2015) offers five effective ways to say no:

  1. Vague but effective: “Thank you for asking, but that isn’t going to work out for me.”
  2. Ask me later: “I want to do that, but I’m not available until April. Will you ask me gain then?”
  3. Keep trying: “None of those dates work for me, but I would love to see you. Send me some more dates.”
  4. Try me last minute: “I can’t put anything else on my calendar this month, but I’d love to do that with you sometime. Will you call me right before you go again?”
  5. Gratitude: “Thank you so much for your enthusiasm and support! I’m sorry I’m not able to help you at this time.”

If you’d like to find out even more effective ways you can say no, read Carter’s full article 21 Ways to “Give Good No.”

Please feel free to pass these great tips along to your team, clients and colleagues!

Source: Greater Good Science Center

econ-calendar=2015-02-17_16-19-12

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

In the unlikely event that you no longer wish to receive these valuable market updates, please USE THIS LINK or email: don@donparsons.com

If you prefer to send your removal request by mail the address is:

Don Parsons
Commerce Mortgage – NMLS 2105
450 Newport Center Drive Suite 350
Newport Beach, CA 92660
2130 Main Street Suite 260
Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Nov 17, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: The Bond markets were closed Tuesday in honor of Veterans Day, while the rest of the week was quiet with only a handful of economic reports on the calendar.

Forecast for the Week: The Fed minutes could cause volatility. Plus, key housing reports, and is inflation still tame?

View: Check out these five tips that can help yield more productive and meaningful work relationships.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update July 21, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: Housing numbers and retails sales were disappointing, wholesale inflation is heating up, and tensions overseas had a big impact on the markets.

Forecast for the Week: Key housing and inflation reports will be released, while earnings season and tensions overseas could impact the markets.

View: Check out these six leadership classics that are worth reading (or re-reading) and that can have a big impact on your success.

Last Week in Review

Some like it hot. That sentiment does not apply to the Bond markets, when it comes to hotter than jul21-retail-salesexpected inflation. Learn what sectors of the economy are heating up, which ones are cooling off—and how the markets and rates responded.

Housing Starts were gloomy in June, as they declined by 9.3 percent from May to an annual rate of 893,000, well below the 1.020 million expected. This was the slowest pace in nine months, led by a drop in single-family homes and apartments. Building Permits, a sign of future construction, also fell by 4.2 percent to an annual rate of 963,000, coming in below expectations. There was a bright spot, as the National Association of Home Builders Housing Market Index came in at 53. Readings above 50 indicate that builders see conditions as good, and this was the first reading above 50 this year. Overall, the housing sector has shown signs of recovery, but activity has leveled off and some readings this year continue to be disappointing.

Retail Sales for June also cooled, coming in at the lowest level since the near -1.0 percent recorded in January. Retail Sales account for about one-third of consumer spending, and they are one of the main drivers of U.S. economic activity, making this report an important one to monitor. On a bright side, the report showed that consumers continue to spend at a better than modest pace.

Meanwhile, the Producer Price Index for June showed that inflation at the wholesale level came in hotter than expected. Remember that inflation is the arch enemy of Bonds, as it reduces the value of fixed investments like Bonds. And since home loan rates are tied to Mortgage Bonds, when inflation heats up, Bonds and home loan rates typically worsen. The upcoming Consumer Price Index for June will be closely watched for any signs that inflation is heating up at the consumer level.

What does this mean for home loan rates? If inflation continues to heat up, it could have a negative impact on Bonds and home loan rates, as we saw early last week. However, the continued tensions in the Ukraine and the Middle East could keep investors in the safe haven of the Bond markets, which would help home loan rates in the process. And earnings season is sure to have an impact—if numbers disappoint, Bonds and home loan rates could benefit.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

Key housing and inflation reports dominate the headlines. Plus, earnings season is in full bloom.

  • Look for the closely-watched Consumer Price Index for June on Tuesday.
  • In housing news, Existing Home Sales for June will also be released on Tuesday, followed by June’s New Home Sales on Thursday.
  • Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will be reported, as usual, on Thursday. Claims continue to hover near the 300,000 level.
  • Ending the week, Durable Goods Orders for June will be delivered Friday.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving—and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further—a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Bonds worsened in the beginning of last week, but improved after tensions overseas caused a flight-to-safety into the Bond markets. Home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year and I will continue to monitor them closely.

Chart: Fannie Mae 4.0% Mortgage Bond (Friday Jul 18, 2014)

middle-image_2014-06-20

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

Your Business Bookshelf
6 Leadership Classics Worth Reading (Or Re-Reading)

Here are six leadership classics worth reading (or re-reading) to help maximize your success:

How To Win Friends and Influence People. Dale Carnegie’s classic is a one-to-one communication manual that covers techniques for handling people, making people like you, winning people over to your way of thinking, and even helping them change (for the better!) without arousing resentment.

Wooden on Leadership: How to Create a Winning Organization. The legendary UCLA basketball coach John Wooden knows how to create winning organizations. In this book, he teaches you how to do the same through his Pyramid of Success, stressing the importance of preparation, and perhaps more importantly, the processes.

Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose. Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh shares why creating an office culture that values happiness first can produce amazing results, not only in customer satisfaction, but also in employee motivation and loyalty—and your own happiness as a result.

The One Minute Manager. Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson’s book has sold over 13 million copies worldwide, and focuses on three techniques: clarifying the goals of your organization, giving praise to your team, and appropriately reprimanding when things go wrong… all in one minute each!

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. This leadership “fable” by multiple-best-selling author and business consultant Patrick Lencioni reveals what’s at the heart of why teams fail—regardless of the dedication of key members—and the timeless method he uses to fix the problem.

Good to Great. Jim Collins offers the results of an exhaustive five-year study of all Fortune 500 companies. He identifies why only 11 of those companies achieved excellent long-term results, while the rest floundered under poor leadership—and how you can avoid making the same mistakes in your team.

As always, please feel free to pass these great reads along to your team, colleagues and clients!

Economic Calendar for the Week of July 21 – July 25

econ-calendar-201407

 

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

Don Parsons
Commerce Mortgage:  NMLS 2105
450 Newport Center Drive Suite 350
Newport Beach, CA 92660
2130 Main Street Suite 260
Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Vantage Production, LLC is the copyright owner or licensee of the content and/or information in this email, unless otherwise indicated. Vantage Production, LLC does not grant to you a license to any content, features or materials in this email. You may not distribute, download, or save a copy of any of the content or screens except as otherwise provided in our Terms and Conditions of Membership, for any purpose.