Mortgage Market Weekly – Update June 1, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: New Home Sales rebounded in April, while the latest Gross Domestic Product reading showed the economy struggled in the first quarter.

Forecast for the Week: Look for key reports on inflation, manufacturing and the labor sector.

View: Make all your video conferences successful by following these easy tips.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Feb 23, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: Recent housing reports were disappointing, while inflation remains low.

Forecast for the Week: February ends on a busy note, with key reports on housing, consumer attitudes, U.S. economic growth and inflation.

View: Protect yourself from identity theft with these important tips.

Last Week in Review

“I knew the record would stand until it was broken.” Yogi Berra. Record low temperatures have hit much of the nation, but that’s not the only chill in the air. [Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Jan 5, 2015

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: The U.S. economy had a strong third quarter, while recent housing reports show signs of slowing in that sector.

Forecast for the Week: On Friday, the Jobs Report for December could be a market mover.

View: If you received new electronics over the holidays, see the tips below for selling, recycling or donating your old gadgets.

Last Week in Review 

“It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day…and I’m feeling good.” Nina Simone. The new year is here, and with home loan rates still near historic lows, 2015 rang in with plenty for consumers to feel good about. Here are some other highlights from the end of 2014.

existing-home-sales-2015-01-05 The final reading for Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third quarter of 2014 came in at a blistering 5.0 percent, the fastest pace of economic growth since the third quarter of 2003. The big gains were led by a surge in both consumer and business spending. GDP is considered the broadest measure of economic activity, so this is a strong sign for our economy heading into the new year.

In housing news, the October S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index came in at an annual rate of 4.5 percent, down from the 4.8 percent recorded in September. The October reading was the eleventh straight month of decelerating price gains. It was also the smallest annual gain since October 2012, as price gains return to more normal levels. Also of note, sales of new and existing homes fell in November as well. The housing market continues to remain in a somewhat choppy trend, despite an improving economy and job market.

As we look ahead into 2015, the uncertainty in Europe will continue to rear its head over time. The European Union (EU) is fighting deflation, recessionary pressures, a Greece exit from the EU, and limited political capital required for the necessary fixes. This could lead to safe haven trading in our bond market, helping Mortgage Bonds and home loan rates (which are tied to Mortgage Bonds) in the process.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near historic lows, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Dec 22, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: While lower oil prices are giving people reason to cheer, there was some disappointing news in the housing sector.

Forecast for the Week: A full slate of economic reports will be released ahead of the Christmas holiday.

View: Saying “no” can be easy with these five tips.

Last Week in Review

“You make me wanna (Shout!)” These days, many people are shouting for joy as gas prices continue to plunge. But was the rest of the week’s news cause to celebrate? Read on for details.

consumer-price-index_2014-12-19Falling gas prices were definitely a key factor leading consumer prices lower in November, as the Consumer Price Index fell by 0.3 percent. The inflation-reading gauge posted its largest monthly decline in six years. Low inflation is good news for Bonds, as inflation reduces the value of fixed investments like Bonds. This means low inflation is also good news for home loan rates, which are tied to Mortgage Bonds.

Over in the housing sector, November Housing Starts fell by 1.6 percent from October to an annual rate of 1.028 million units. Single-family starts fell 5.4 percent, while the volatile multi-family segment rose by 6.7 percent. Building Permits in November also declined. Despite these decreases, the housing sector has been improving overall. In addition, the recent strong Jobs Report for November is a good sign for economic growth next year—and that should help the housing sector continue its otherwise improving trend.

Also of significance: The Fed held its last Federal Open Market Committee meeting of 2014, and it noted that it will keep the Fed Funds Rate (the rate banks use to lend money to each other overnight) low until it feels that the economy can function normally with higher rates. This led to a rally in Stocks, while Mortgage Bonds and home loan rates remain near 18-month bests.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year, and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

The first half of the week will be busy, with key reports on housing, inflation and economic growth.

  • In the housing sector, Existing Home Sales for November will be released on Monday. November New Home Sales follow on Tuesday.
  • The final reading on third quarter Gross Domestic Product will be closely watched when the numbers are delivered on Tuesday.
  • Tuesday also brings several more key reports, including the Consumer Sentiment Index, Durable Goods Orders, Personal Income, Personal Spending and Personal Consumption Expenditures (the Fed’s favorite measure of inflation).
  • Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will be released on Wednesday instead of Thursday due to the Christmas holiday.

The Stock markets will close early at 1:00 p.m. EST on Wednesday, December 24, while the Bond markets will be closing at 2:00 p.m. EST. All markets will be closed on Thursday, December 25 in observance of Christmas. On Friday, December 26 there will be normal market hours.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Mortgage Bonds remain near 18-month highs, meaning home loan rates are still hovering near historic lows.

Chart: Fannie Mae 3.5% Mortgage Bond (Friday Dec 19, 2014)

mortgage-bonds_2014-12-19

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

5 Ways to Say No

The holidays aren’t the only time of year people over-commit themselves and being able to say no isn’t always easy. But there are ways to say no that make all the difference, and can help you preserve both your sanity and your relationships.

Christine Carter, Ph.D., sociologist, happiness expert at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, and author of “The Sweet Spot: How to Find Your Groove at Home and Work” (coming January 2015) offers five effective ways to say no:

  1. Vague but effective: “Thank you for asking, but that isn’t going to work out for me.”
  2. Ask me later: “I want to do that, but I’m not available until April. Will you ask me gain then?”
  3. Keep trying: “None of those dates work for me, but I would love to see you. Send me some more dates.”
  4. Try me last minute: “I can’t put anything else on my calendar this month, but I’d love to do that with you sometime. Will you call me right before you go again?”
  5. Gratitude: “Thank you so much for your enthusiasm and support! I’m sorry I’m not able to help you at this time.”

If you’d like to find out even more effective ways you can say no, read Carter’s full article 21 Ways to “Give Good No.”

Please feel free to pass these great tips along to your team, clients and colleagues!

Source: Greater Good Science Center

econ-calendar=2015-02-17_16-19-12

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

In the unlikely event that you no longer wish to receive these valuable market updates, please USE THIS LINK or email: don@donparsons.com

If you prefer to send your removal request by mail the address is:

Don Parsons
Commerce Mortgage – NMLS 2105
450 Newport Center Drive Suite 350
Newport Beach, CA 92660
2130 Main Street Suite 260
Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Nov 24, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: The housing sector continues to improve, as home loan rates remain near annual lows.

Forecast for the Week: Look for news on housing, inflation, consumer confidence and the state of our economy—all ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday.

View: Get more from your lunch hour with these great tips.

Last Week in Review

Time is on our side. Time continues to be on the side of potential homebuyers, as home loan rates remain near 18-month lows. But could a hint of inflation be creeping into our economy – and if so, could higher home loan rates be on the horizon? [Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update Aug 25, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: Key reports indicate that the housing recovery is back on track, while inflation remains tame.

Forecast for the Week: August ends on a busy note, with important reports on housing, inflation, economic growth and more.

View: Need some extra help at the office? Check out these six steps for hiring an intern.

Last Week in Review

“There is nothing as sweet as a comeback.” Anne Lamott. That’s certainly true when it comes to the housing sector, as recent reports indicate that the stall in the housing recovery seen late last year and in recent months may be over.

housing-starts_2014-08-22Housing Starts for July surged by nearly 16 percent to an annual rate of 1.093 million, above expectations and up from the 945,000 in June. Building Permits, a sign of future construction, also came in above expectations while Existing Home Sales for July increased by 2.4 percent from June.

In addition, the National Association of Home Builders Housing Market Index, which is a measure of builder confidence, rose two points to 55 in August from the 53 recorded in July. This was the third straight monthly gain and brings the index to its highest level since the 56 recorded in January. As a rule, 50 is the line between positive and negative sentiment. All in all, these reports are a good sign that the housing sector is coming back strong.

In other news, despite signs earlier this summer that inflation may be heating up, the latest reports show that inflation at the consumer level remains tame. This is good news for Bonds, as inflation reduces the value of fixed investments like Bonds. And since home loan rates are tied to Mortgage Bonds, tame inflation is typically good news for home loan rates as well.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year and now is a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

The economic calendar is packed this week with key housing, inflation, manufacturing and economic growth data.

  • Housing news kicks off the week with July New Home Sales on Monday. The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Index follows on Tuesday, with Pending Home Sales for July being reported Thursday.
  • We’ll get a sense of how consumers are feeling with Consumer Confidence on Tuesday and the Consumer Sentiment Index on Friday.
  • Look for Durable Goods Orders (i.e. orders for items that last for an extended period of time) on Tuesday.
  • Important news is ahead Thursday with the second reading of second quarter Gross Domestic Product.
  • Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will also be reported on Thursday. Claims continue to hover near the 300,000 mark.
  • Friday wraps up the week with Personal Income, Personal Spending and Personal Consumption Expenditures, the Fed’s favorite measure of inflation. Regional manufacturing news via the Chicago PMI will also be reported.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Mortgage Bonds improved in the latter part of the week despite the positive housing data. Home loan rates remain near some of their best levels of the year and I’ll continue to monitor them closely.

Chart: Fannie Mae 4.0% Mortgage Bond (Friday Aug 22, 2014)

aug22-bonds-chart

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

6 Steps for Hiring an Intern

Hiring an intern is a win-win. The intern gains valuable skills and experience. You gain extra help on a temporary basis. Follow these six steps to hire an intern:

  1. Create a clear, meaningful job description. Do you need someone to focus on a special project or a social media coordinator to expand your social media outreach? Include the time commitment (usually up to 20 hours per week) and preferred work hours. Finally, outline the compensation (e.g., hourly wage or stipend).
  2. Recruit candidates. Turn to social media, your networks, and local colleges and universities. Provide the job description for reference.
  3. Prepare a workspace. Your intern will need a computer and a comfortable space. A phone may be necessary if the intern is calling contacts on your behalf.
  4. Plan for mentoring and supervision. Your intern will be learning everything from job responsibilities, to appropriate dress code, to performance expectations, and office protocol. Plan for guidance every step of the way.
  5. Give specific feedback. Concrete praise encourages a repeat performance. Concrete constructive feedback allows for corrective action. If you work with a college, you may have additional requirements of reporting to an internship coordinator or having a site visit.
  6. Offer to be a reference. Internships aren’t expected to lead directly to a job with the host company. Offer to be a reference and speak about your interns’ job responsibilities and strengths with their prospective employers.

As always, please feel free to pass these tips along to your team, colleagues and clients.

Sources: Forbes.com, inc.com, internprofits.com, sba.gov

Economic Calendar for the Week of August 25 – August 29

economic-chart-aug22

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

Don Parsons
Commerce Mortgage – NMLS 2105
450 Newport Center Drive Suite 350
Newport Beach, CA 92660
2130 Main Street Suite 260
Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Mortgage Market Weekly – Update June 20, 2014

In This Issue…

Last Week in Review: Housing is cooling, inflation is warming and the Fed announced more tapering.

Forecast for the Week: Important housing, inflation and consumer confidence reports are ahead. Plus, we’ll get news on the state of our economy with the final reading for first quarter Gross Domestic Product.

View: Good communication skills are critical to succeeding in business. Mastering the art of telling a good story is a key component. [Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly Update – Dec 16, 2013

In This Issue

Last Week in Review: There was important labor and housing market news, and fear regarding the Fed tapering its Bond purchases led to volatility in the markets.

Forecast for the Week: This week’s calendar is packed with key reports on U.S. growth, manufacturing, inflation, housing and jobs data. Plus the Fed meets.

View: Never quite know what to say in your sales emails? Check out the great guide below.

Last Week in Review

“A step in the right direction.” Barbra Streisand obviously wasn’t singing about the housing market in her 1980’s song. But those lyrics were fitting with last week’s housing news. Read on for details.

Initial-Jobless-Claims_2013-nov9-dec7There was good news on the foreclosure front as research firm CoreLogic reported that completed foreclosures in October declined by 30 percent from those completed in October 2012. In addition, the foreclosure inventory declined by 28 percent this year while the rate of serious delinquency is at its lowest level since November 2008. RealtyTrac also reported that foreclosure inventory fell by 15 percent from October to November. This is good news for the housing industry, but with almost 900,000 properties across the nation still in foreclosure a level four times the normal the housing recovery still has more to go.

In other news, Weekly Initial Jobless Claims surged in the latest week by 68,000 to 368,000, which is the highest level since early October. The previous week, Weekly Initial Jobless Claims dropped to 300,000, but that was most likely influenced by the Thanksgiving holiday, as filers could have waited until after the holiday to process their claims. Also of note, Retail Sales for November came in above expectations.

What does this mean for home loan rates? The labor and housing markets are key areas the Fed has been watching as it determines when to taper its Bond purchases. Remember that the Fed has been purchasing $85 billion in Bonds and Treasuries each month to stimulate the economy and housing market. One of the key topics the Fed will be deciding at its December 17-18 meeting is whether to taper its purchases before or after the new year. Fear regarding this decision has led to volatility in the markets in recent weeks, and this topic is sure to impact the markets and home loan rates in the coming weeks and months.

The bottom line is that home loan rates remain attractive compared to historical levels and now remains a great time to consider a home purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

Forecast for the Week

This week’s packed economic calendar is filled with key reports each day.

Monday brings news on Productivity for the third quarter and the Empire State Manufacturing Index. The Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index will be reported on Thursday.
Look for inflation news on Tuesday with the Consumer Price Index.

Also on Tuesday, the National Association of Home Builders Housing Market Index will be released. More housing news follows on Wednesday with Housing Starts and Building Permits. Existing Home Sales will be delivered Thursday.

As usual, Thursday brings Weekly Initial Jobless Claims and comes after last week’s big spike.
On Friday, the final reading on Gross Domestic Product for the third quarter will be announced.

In addition, the two-day Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting begins on Tuesday and ends on Wednesday with the Fed’s monetary policy statement being delivered at 2:00 p.m. ET. All eyes will be watching to see if the Fed decides to begin tapering its Bond purchases.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond that home loan rates are based on.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving  and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, volatility has been rampant, as some positive economic reports have caused concern that the Fed will taper its Bond purchases sooner rather than later. I will be watching the news closely this week to see what happens after the Fed meeting.

Fannie Mae 4.0% Mortgage Bond (Friday Dec 13, 2013):

FannieMaeMortgageBond2013_12-16

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

Getting It In Writing
5 Steps to the Perfect Sales Email

Not all email is created equal, and that’s the reason you wouldn’t send the same email to a new prospect as you would your old Uncle Ned. If you’ve got something to sell–an idea, a meeting, a product, or even yourself–and you want to do it by email, keep these five step-by-step instructions handy:

STEP 1: Research Roundup. The first step in writing the perfect sales email is to not write anything until you’re prepared. It only takes a few minutes to Google the background of your recipient and gather other facts or trigger events to provide context and legitimate reasons for making contact.

STEP 2: Subject Scrutiny. You won’t close a deal on your first email, so focus exclusively on getting a response. The subject line has one purpose and one purpose only: to get the recipient to read your email.

Be as direct as possible:

  • Question about [personalized topic]
  • Idea for [something important to them]
  • Fred Jones said I should get in touch
  • Janet, quick question for you

STEP 3: For Openers. Don’t start by introducing yourself, start with something you noticed about them (a blog post or news item), something you have in common (mutual membership), or someone you both know–your reason for writing:

  • Janet, I noticed you…
  • Bob, Fred Jones mentioned that…
  • Mike, Congratulations on…

STEP 4: Connect the Dots. The main body of your email is where you should show your value. Remember, it’s all about response–so start a dialog by asking an insightful question. This highlights your value better than a long list of qualifications or product benefits.

STEP 5: Focused Farewell. In addition to “Sincerely” your salutation should be short, be in plain text with your contact info (no obtrusive logos), and include a link to one online profile of choice.

Feel free to pass these tips along to your team, clients, and colleagues.

Economic Calendar for the Week of December 16 – December 20

econ-calendar-20131216

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.

In the unlikely event that you no longer wish to receive these valuable market updates, please USE THIS LINK or email: don@donparsons.com

If you prefer to send your removal request by mail the address is:

Don Parsons
Jayco Capital – NMLS 2105
18831 Von Karman Ave.
Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92612

Mortgage Market Weekly Update – Dec 9, 2013

In This Issue

Last Week in Review: Key housing and jobs data was released. Plus a surprising read on Gross Domestic Product, the broadest measure of economic activity.

Forecast for the Week: This week’s economic calendar is light, featuring readings on retail sales, jobless claims and wholesale inflation.

View: See the important time tip that can make all the difference any time of year.

Last Week in Review

“Tomorrow is often the busiest day of the week.” Spanish Proverb. And it sure seemed that way with last week’s busy economic calendar, as Friday’s Jobs Report capped off a week filled with data. Here are the highlights.

GDP_2013-12-06The highly anticipated November Jobs Report revealed that employers created 203,000 jobs last month, above the 188,000 expected. The Unemployment Rate fell to a 5-year low of 7 percent while the Labor Force Participation Rate (LFPR) managed to tick up to 63.0 percent, though it is still at lows not seen since the late 1970s. The LFPR is a measure of how many people are looking for work. All in all this was a good report, but the labor market is not out of the woods yet.

[Read more…]

Mortgage Market Weekly Update – Jun 21, 2013

In This Issue

Last Week in Review: The Fed met and the volatility continued. Find out how home loan rates were impacted.

Forecast for the Week: The last week of June will be busy, with news on housing, inflation, consumer confidence and more.

View: Been wondering what those #Hashtags are really about, and if they really do make a difference? Learn more below.

Last Week in Review

“I’m free…free fallin’.” Tom Petty. Mortgage Bonds continued to fall last week as the Fed met and more volatility followed. Read on to learn what happened.

existing-home-sales-may2012-2013After last week’s meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), the Fed released its Policy Statement, noting that the downside risks to the outlook for the economy and labor market have diminished. Especially important: There was no mention of tapering their Bond Purchase program known as Quantitative Easing.

However, in the press conference that followed, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said, “Assuming the economy and labor conditions evolve as the Committee expects, the Fed anticipated it would begin tapering later this year and to finish by mid-2014.” This mixed message caused a sell-off in both Stocks and Bonds, adding to the volatility the markets have seen of late.

In economic reports of note, there was more good news in the housing sector as Existing Home Sales rose by 5.18 million units annualized in May. This is an increase of 12.9 percent from May 2012 and the highest rate since 5.44 million units were sold in November 2009. Housing Starts also rose by 7 percent in May, and though they came in lower than expected, they are actually up a whopping 28 percent since May 2012. [Read more…]